artblackafrica:

Tanzanian artist Rehema Chachage (Dar es Salaam, 1987) creates video, sculptural, performance and image installations which explore the theme of gender, identity, voicelessness and alienation. She graduated in 2009 with a BFA from Michaelis School of Fine Art, University of Cape Town. Her artistic pieces make use of ritualization, subversion and tension, reflecting the four years she spent in South Africa as a ‘cultural foreigner’ and as a black female student in a predominantly white middle-class setting.

Mizizi/Nasaba explores the state of bereavement and the politics of gender in African society when it comes to inheritance. It consists of digital prints that document a relationship between a bereaved daughter and the text that was left behind by her deceased father—which is her only true inheritance since all material inheritance (according to beliefs in most African society) is ‘ideally’ left behind for the male subjects in the family. - Rehema Chacage on her work, pictured above.
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artblackafrica:

Tanzanian artist Rehema Chachage (Dar es Salaam, 1987) creates video, sculptural, performance and image installations which explore the theme of gender, identity, voicelessness and alienation. She graduated in 2009 with a BFA from Michaelis School of Fine Art, University of Cape Town. Her artistic pieces make use of ritualization, subversion and tension, reflecting the four years she spent in South Africa as a ‘cultural foreigner’ and as a black female student in a predominantly white middle-class setting.

Mizizi/Nasaba explores the state of bereavement and the politics of gender in African society when it comes to inheritance. It consists of digital prints that document a relationship between a bereaved daughter and the text that was left behind by her deceased father—which is her only true inheritance since all material inheritance (according to beliefs in most African society) is ‘ideally’ left behind for the male subjects in the family. - Rehema Chacage on her work, pictured above.
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artblackafrica:

Tanzanian artist Rehema Chachage (Dar es Salaam, 1987) creates video, sculptural, performance and image installations which explore the theme of gender, identity, voicelessness and alienation. She graduated in 2009 with a BFA from Michaelis School of Fine Art, University of Cape Town. Her artistic pieces make use of ritualization, subversion and tension, reflecting the four years she spent in South Africa as a ‘cultural foreigner’ and as a black female student in a predominantly white middle-class setting.

Mizizi/Nasaba explores the state of bereavement and the politics of gender in African society when it comes to inheritance. It consists of digital prints that document a relationship between a bereaved daughter and the text that was left behind by her deceased father—which is her only true inheritance since all material inheritance (according to beliefs in most African society) is ‘ideally’ left behind for the male subjects in the family. - Rehema Chacage on her work, pictured above.
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artblackafrica:

Tanzanian artist Rehema Chachage (Dar es Salaam, 1987) creates video, sculptural, performance and image installations which explore the theme of gender, identity, voicelessness and alienation. She graduated in 2009 with a BFA from Michaelis School of Fine Art, University of Cape Town. Her artistic pieces make use of ritualization, subversion and tension, reflecting the four years she spent in South Africa as a ‘cultural foreigner’ and as a black female student in a predominantly white middle-class setting.

Mizizi/Nasaba explores the state of bereavement and the politics of gender in African society when it comes to inheritance. It consists of digital prints that document a relationship between a bereaved daughter and the text that was left behind by her deceased father—which is her only true inheritance since all material inheritance (according to beliefs in most African society) is ‘ideally’ left behind for the male subjects in the family. - Rehema Chacage on her work, pictured above.
Zoom Info

artblackafrica:

Tanzanian artist Rehema Chachage (Dar es Salaam, 1987) creates video, sculptural, performance and image installations which explore the theme of gender, identity, voicelessness and alienation. She graduated in 2009 with a BFA from Michaelis School of Fine Art, University of Cape Town. Her artistic pieces make use of ritualization, subversion and tension, reflecting the four years she spent in South Africa as a ‘cultural foreigner’ and as a black female student in a predominantly white middle-class setting.

Mizizi/Nasaba explores the state of bereavement and the politics of gender in African society when it comes to inheritance. It consists of digital prints that document a relationship between a bereaved daughter and the text that was left behind by her deceased father—which is her only true inheritance since all material inheritance (according to beliefs in most African society) is ‘ideally’ left behind for the male subjects in the family. - Rehema Chacage on her work, pictured above.

logorofafrica:

"Rugby at Art."
As the official photographer for ‘Cowrie Rugby FC” and also the “Nigerian Rugby Federation” i get away with some lucky Artsy shots for my portfolio pleasure when i’m covering the games. 
I got away with this set of photos on saturday during the “SouthWest League” at the National Stadium, Surulere. Lagos. 
Enjoy and please follow @CowrieFc and @NigeriaRugby1 on Twitter and like their pages on Facebook. 
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logorofafrica:

"Rugby at Art."
As the official photographer for ‘Cowrie Rugby FC” and also the “Nigerian Rugby Federation” i get away with some lucky Artsy shots for my portfolio pleasure when i’m covering the games. 
I got away with this set of photos on saturday during the “SouthWest League” at the National Stadium, Surulere. Lagos. 
Enjoy and please follow @CowrieFc and @NigeriaRugby1 on Twitter and like their pages on Facebook. 
Zoom Info
logorofafrica:

"Rugby at Art."
As the official photographer for ‘Cowrie Rugby FC” and also the “Nigerian Rugby Federation” i get away with some lucky Artsy shots for my portfolio pleasure when i’m covering the games. 
I got away with this set of photos on saturday during the “SouthWest League” at the National Stadium, Surulere. Lagos. 
Enjoy and please follow @CowrieFc and @NigeriaRugby1 on Twitter and like their pages on Facebook. 
Zoom Info
logorofafrica:

"Rugby at Art."
As the official photographer for ‘Cowrie Rugby FC” and also the “Nigerian Rugby Federation” i get away with some lucky Artsy shots for my portfolio pleasure when i’m covering the games. 
I got away with this set of photos on saturday during the “SouthWest League” at the National Stadium, Surulere. Lagos. 
Enjoy and please follow @CowrieFc and @NigeriaRugby1 on Twitter and like their pages on Facebook. 
Zoom Info
logorofafrica:

"Rugby at Art."
As the official photographer for ‘Cowrie Rugby FC” and also the “Nigerian Rugby Federation” i get away with some lucky Artsy shots for my portfolio pleasure when i’m covering the games. 
I got away with this set of photos on saturday during the “SouthWest League” at the National Stadium, Surulere. Lagos. 
Enjoy and please follow @CowrieFc and @NigeriaRugby1 on Twitter and like their pages on Facebook. 
Zoom Info
logorofafrica:

"Rugby at Art."
As the official photographer for ‘Cowrie Rugby FC” and also the “Nigerian Rugby Federation” i get away with some lucky Artsy shots for my portfolio pleasure when i’m covering the games. 
I got away with this set of photos on saturday during the “SouthWest League” at the National Stadium, Surulere. Lagos. 
Enjoy and please follow @CowrieFc and @NigeriaRugby1 on Twitter and like their pages on Facebook. 
Zoom Info
logorofafrica:

"Rugby at Art."
As the official photographer for ‘Cowrie Rugby FC” and also the “Nigerian Rugby Federation” i get away with some lucky Artsy shots for my portfolio pleasure when i’m covering the games. 
I got away with this set of photos on saturday during the “SouthWest League” at the National Stadium, Surulere. Lagos. 
Enjoy and please follow @CowrieFc and @NigeriaRugby1 on Twitter and like their pages on Facebook. 
Zoom Info

logorofafrica:

"Rugby at Art."

As the official photographer for ‘Cowrie Rugby FC” and also the “Nigerian Rugby Federation” i get away with some lucky Artsy shots for my portfolio pleasure when i’m covering the games. 

I got away with this set of photos on saturday during the “SouthWest League” at the National Stadium, Surulere. Lagos. 

Enjoy and please follow @CowrieFc and @NigeriaRugby1 on Twitter and like their pages on Facebook. 

yagazieemezi:

Space Age Buildings of Africa
Throughout the world, the 1950’s Space Age was known for its beautiful, bold architecture,full of swooshy curves and spaceship-shaped buildings. But some of the most vibrant and retro-futuristic buildings of the Space Age can be found in Africa. Here are the most amazing architectural achievements from Space-Age Africa. By Vince Miklos.
Mausoleum of Agostinho Neto, the first president of independent Angola in Luanda, Angola
Building in Warri, Nigeria
Kariakoo Market in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
Memorial to the Martyrs in Ouagadougou, the capital city of Burkina Faso
Bujumbura International Airport, Bujumbura, Burundi
The CNPS building (The National Social Insurance Fund):
St. Paul’s Cathedral in Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire (Ivory Coast), designed by Aldo Spirito, consecrated in 1980
The National Assembly, the parliament of Cameroon
See more here
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic
Zoom Info
yagazieemezi:

Space Age Buildings of Africa
Throughout the world, the 1950’s Space Age was known for its beautiful, bold architecture,full of swooshy curves and spaceship-shaped buildings. But some of the most vibrant and retro-futuristic buildings of the Space Age can be found in Africa. Here are the most amazing architectural achievements from Space-Age Africa. By Vince Miklos.
Mausoleum of Agostinho Neto, the first president of independent Angola in Luanda, Angola
Building in Warri, Nigeria
Kariakoo Market in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
Memorial to the Martyrs in Ouagadougou, the capital city of Burkina Faso
Bujumbura International Airport, Bujumbura, Burundi
The CNPS building (The National Social Insurance Fund):
St. Paul’s Cathedral in Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire (Ivory Coast), designed by Aldo Spirito, consecrated in 1980
The National Assembly, the parliament of Cameroon
See more here
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic
Zoom Info
yagazieemezi:

Space Age Buildings of Africa
Throughout the world, the 1950’s Space Age was known for its beautiful, bold architecture,full of swooshy curves and spaceship-shaped buildings. But some of the most vibrant and retro-futuristic buildings of the Space Age can be found in Africa. Here are the most amazing architectural achievements from Space-Age Africa. By Vince Miklos.
Mausoleum of Agostinho Neto, the first president of independent Angola in Luanda, Angola
Building in Warri, Nigeria
Kariakoo Market in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
Memorial to the Martyrs in Ouagadougou, the capital city of Burkina Faso
Bujumbura International Airport, Bujumbura, Burundi
The CNPS building (The National Social Insurance Fund):
St. Paul’s Cathedral in Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire (Ivory Coast), designed by Aldo Spirito, consecrated in 1980
The National Assembly, the parliament of Cameroon
See more here
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic
Zoom Info
yagazieemezi:

Space Age Buildings of Africa
Throughout the world, the 1950’s Space Age was known for its beautiful, bold architecture,full of swooshy curves and spaceship-shaped buildings. But some of the most vibrant and retro-futuristic buildings of the Space Age can be found in Africa. Here are the most amazing architectural achievements from Space-Age Africa. By Vince Miklos.
Mausoleum of Agostinho Neto, the first president of independent Angola in Luanda, Angola
Building in Warri, Nigeria
Kariakoo Market in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
Memorial to the Martyrs in Ouagadougou, the capital city of Burkina Faso
Bujumbura International Airport, Bujumbura, Burundi
The CNPS building (The National Social Insurance Fund):
St. Paul’s Cathedral in Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire (Ivory Coast), designed by Aldo Spirito, consecrated in 1980
The National Assembly, the parliament of Cameroon
See more here
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic
Zoom Info
yagazieemezi:

Space Age Buildings of Africa
Throughout the world, the 1950’s Space Age was known for its beautiful, bold architecture,full of swooshy curves and spaceship-shaped buildings. But some of the most vibrant and retro-futuristic buildings of the Space Age can be found in Africa. Here are the most amazing architectural achievements from Space-Age Africa. By Vince Miklos.
Mausoleum of Agostinho Neto, the first president of independent Angola in Luanda, Angola
Building in Warri, Nigeria
Kariakoo Market in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
Memorial to the Martyrs in Ouagadougou, the capital city of Burkina Faso
Bujumbura International Airport, Bujumbura, Burundi
The CNPS building (The National Social Insurance Fund):
St. Paul’s Cathedral in Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire (Ivory Coast), designed by Aldo Spirito, consecrated in 1980
The National Assembly, the parliament of Cameroon
See more here
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic
Zoom Info
yagazieemezi:

Space Age Buildings of Africa
Throughout the world, the 1950’s Space Age was known for its beautiful, bold architecture,full of swooshy curves and spaceship-shaped buildings. But some of the most vibrant and retro-futuristic buildings of the Space Age can be found in Africa. Here are the most amazing architectural achievements from Space-Age Africa. By Vince Miklos.
Mausoleum of Agostinho Neto, the first president of independent Angola in Luanda, Angola
Building in Warri, Nigeria
Kariakoo Market in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
Memorial to the Martyrs in Ouagadougou, the capital city of Burkina Faso
Bujumbura International Airport, Bujumbura, Burundi
The CNPS building (The National Social Insurance Fund):
St. Paul’s Cathedral in Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire (Ivory Coast), designed by Aldo Spirito, consecrated in 1980
The National Assembly, the parliament of Cameroon
See more here
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic
Zoom Info
yagazieemezi:

Space Age Buildings of Africa
Throughout the world, the 1950’s Space Age was known for its beautiful, bold architecture,full of swooshy curves and spaceship-shaped buildings. But some of the most vibrant and retro-futuristic buildings of the Space Age can be found in Africa. Here are the most amazing architectural achievements from Space-Age Africa. By Vince Miklos.
Mausoleum of Agostinho Neto, the first president of independent Angola in Luanda, Angola
Building in Warri, Nigeria
Kariakoo Market in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
Memorial to the Martyrs in Ouagadougou, the capital city of Burkina Faso
Bujumbura International Airport, Bujumbura, Burundi
The CNPS building (The National Social Insurance Fund):
St. Paul’s Cathedral in Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire (Ivory Coast), designed by Aldo Spirito, consecrated in 1980
The National Assembly, the parliament of Cameroon
See more here
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic
Zoom Info
yagazieemezi:

Space Age Buildings of Africa
Throughout the world, the 1950’s Space Age was known for its beautiful, bold architecture,full of swooshy curves and spaceship-shaped buildings. But some of the most vibrant and retro-futuristic buildings of the Space Age can be found in Africa. Here are the most amazing architectural achievements from Space-Age Africa. By Vince Miklos.
Mausoleum of Agostinho Neto, the first president of independent Angola in Luanda, Angola
Building in Warri, Nigeria
Kariakoo Market in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
Memorial to the Martyrs in Ouagadougou, the capital city of Burkina Faso
Bujumbura International Airport, Bujumbura, Burundi
The CNPS building (The National Social Insurance Fund):
St. Paul’s Cathedral in Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire (Ivory Coast), designed by Aldo Spirito, consecrated in 1980
The National Assembly, the parliament of Cameroon
See more here
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic
Zoom Info

yagazieemezi:

Space Age Buildings of Africa

Throughout the world, the 1950’s Space Age was known for its beautiful, bold architecture,full of swooshy curves and spaceship-shaped buildings. But some of the most vibrant and retro-futuristic buildings of the Space Age can be found in Africa. Here are the most amazing architectural achievements from Space-Age Africa. By Vince Miklos.

  1. Mausoleum of Agostinho Neto, the first president of independent Angola in Luanda, Angola
  2. Building in Warri, Nigeria
  3. Kariakoo Market in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
  4. Memorial to the Martyrs in Ouagadougou, the capital city of Burkina Faso
  5. Bujumbura International Airport, Bujumbura, Burundi
  6. The CNPS building (The National Social Insurance Fund):
  7. St. Paul’s Cathedral in Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire (Ivory Coast), designed by Aldo Spirito, consecrated in 1980
  8. The National Assembly, the parliament of Cameroon

See more here

Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram

Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

iluvsouthernafrica:

Lesotho:
The Basotho women’s art of house decoration:  Litema
 “The word Litema (pronounced as “di-the-ma”) is derived from the word “ho lema” which means to cultivate, and “tema”, which denotes a ploughed field. The geometric patterns appeared initially on the inside of dwellings and it was only in the 19th century that it appeared on the outside of homes. In contemporary times the practice of Litema appears to be a seasonal phenomenon associated with special events such as celebrations and religious ceremonies. It not only announces births, deaths, weddings or the arrival of Christmas and Easter, but also serves as a reminder of the passage of time.
It is a tradition where women decorate a house after the men have finished building the house. These highly decorative designs are soft and flowing geometric patterns that are applied with fingers, forks and sticks on the walls of houses.The patterns are sometimes coloured with natural pigments or commercial paint and stains. Stones, embedded in mud and relief designs are sometimes used as a more permanent effect.
Before important events, an entire village might be decorated. Traditionally a chief artist or advisor was called upon to direct and advise the women of the village on the types of design or methods of application. The special occasion became a social event in itself. Whilst squatting and drinking tea, the most skilled Litema artist would sketch her intentions in the dust. Once consensus on a design had been reached, women set out to work. Nowadays, it appears, each woman (possibly joined by members of her household and daughters) prefers her individual design and house decoration. The start of decorating times are greeted with much excitement from friends and neighbours who generously participate in terms of giving advice and moral support. Thus it is still an opportunity for a social get-together. The tradition of mural art in Southern Africa, and in particular the tradition of Litema, is not of recent origins.
Like flowers, Litema blooms with the arrival of spring and wilts with the approach of winter. It dies with the temporary surface of mud it adorns. As the suns dries and cracks the design, the rains come to wash away the ‘dead’ design, making way for new decorative opportunities.”
Author: Rudi de Lange; Photos by Carina Mylene Beyer  & unknown photographer
Zoom Info
iluvsouthernafrica:

Lesotho:
The Basotho women’s art of house decoration:  Litema
 “The word Litema (pronounced as “di-the-ma”) is derived from the word “ho lema” which means to cultivate, and “tema”, which denotes a ploughed field. The geometric patterns appeared initially on the inside of dwellings and it was only in the 19th century that it appeared on the outside of homes. In contemporary times the practice of Litema appears to be a seasonal phenomenon associated with special events such as celebrations and religious ceremonies. It not only announces births, deaths, weddings or the arrival of Christmas and Easter, but also serves as a reminder of the passage of time.
It is a tradition where women decorate a house after the men have finished building the house. These highly decorative designs are soft and flowing geometric patterns that are applied with fingers, forks and sticks on the walls of houses.The patterns are sometimes coloured with natural pigments or commercial paint and stains. Stones, embedded in mud and relief designs are sometimes used as a more permanent effect.
Before important events, an entire village might be decorated. Traditionally a chief artist or advisor was called upon to direct and advise the women of the village on the types of design or methods of application. The special occasion became a social event in itself. Whilst squatting and drinking tea, the most skilled Litema artist would sketch her intentions in the dust. Once consensus on a design had been reached, women set out to work. Nowadays, it appears, each woman (possibly joined by members of her household and daughters) prefers her individual design and house decoration. The start of decorating times are greeted with much excitement from friends and neighbours who generously participate in terms of giving advice and moral support. Thus it is still an opportunity for a social get-together. The tradition of mural art in Southern Africa, and in particular the tradition of Litema, is not of recent origins.
Like flowers, Litema blooms with the arrival of spring and wilts with the approach of winter. It dies with the temporary surface of mud it adorns. As the suns dries and cracks the design, the rains come to wash away the ‘dead’ design, making way for new decorative opportunities.”
Author: Rudi de Lange; Photos by Carina Mylene Beyer  & unknown photographer
Zoom Info
iluvsouthernafrica:

Lesotho:
The Basotho women’s art of house decoration:  Litema
 “The word Litema (pronounced as “di-the-ma”) is derived from the word “ho lema” which means to cultivate, and “tema”, which denotes a ploughed field. The geometric patterns appeared initially on the inside of dwellings and it was only in the 19th century that it appeared on the outside of homes. In contemporary times the practice of Litema appears to be a seasonal phenomenon associated with special events such as celebrations and religious ceremonies. It not only announces births, deaths, weddings or the arrival of Christmas and Easter, but also serves as a reminder of the passage of time.
It is a tradition where women decorate a house after the men have finished building the house. These highly decorative designs are soft and flowing geometric patterns that are applied with fingers, forks and sticks on the walls of houses.The patterns are sometimes coloured with natural pigments or commercial paint and stains. Stones, embedded in mud and relief designs are sometimes used as a more permanent effect.
Before important events, an entire village might be decorated. Traditionally a chief artist or advisor was called upon to direct and advise the women of the village on the types of design or methods of application. The special occasion became a social event in itself. Whilst squatting and drinking tea, the most skilled Litema artist would sketch her intentions in the dust. Once consensus on a design had been reached, women set out to work. Nowadays, it appears, each woman (possibly joined by members of her household and daughters) prefers her individual design and house decoration. The start of decorating times are greeted with much excitement from friends and neighbours who generously participate in terms of giving advice and moral support. Thus it is still an opportunity for a social get-together. The tradition of mural art in Southern Africa, and in particular the tradition of Litema, is not of recent origins.
Like flowers, Litema blooms with the arrival of spring and wilts with the approach of winter. It dies with the temporary surface of mud it adorns. As the suns dries and cracks the design, the rains come to wash away the ‘dead’ design, making way for new decorative opportunities.”
Author: Rudi de Lange; Photos by Carina Mylene Beyer  & unknown photographer
Zoom Info
iluvsouthernafrica:

Lesotho:
The Basotho women’s art of house decoration:  Litema
 “The word Litema (pronounced as “di-the-ma”) is derived from the word “ho lema” which means to cultivate, and “tema”, which denotes a ploughed field. The geometric patterns appeared initially on the inside of dwellings and it was only in the 19th century that it appeared on the outside of homes. In contemporary times the practice of Litema appears to be a seasonal phenomenon associated with special events such as celebrations and religious ceremonies. It not only announces births, deaths, weddings or the arrival of Christmas and Easter, but also serves as a reminder of the passage of time.
It is a tradition where women decorate a house after the men have finished building the house. These highly decorative designs are soft and flowing geometric patterns that are applied with fingers, forks and sticks on the walls of houses.The patterns are sometimes coloured with natural pigments or commercial paint and stains. Stones, embedded in mud and relief designs are sometimes used as a more permanent effect.
Before important events, an entire village might be decorated. Traditionally a chief artist or advisor was called upon to direct and advise the women of the village on the types of design or methods of application. The special occasion became a social event in itself. Whilst squatting and drinking tea, the most skilled Litema artist would sketch her intentions in the dust. Once consensus on a design had been reached, women set out to work. Nowadays, it appears, each woman (possibly joined by members of her household and daughters) prefers her individual design and house decoration. The start of decorating times are greeted with much excitement from friends and neighbours who generously participate in terms of giving advice and moral support. Thus it is still an opportunity for a social get-together. The tradition of mural art in Southern Africa, and in particular the tradition of Litema, is not of recent origins.
Like flowers, Litema blooms with the arrival of spring and wilts with the approach of winter. It dies with the temporary surface of mud it adorns. As the suns dries and cracks the design, the rains come to wash away the ‘dead’ design, making way for new decorative opportunities.”
Author: Rudi de Lange; Photos by Carina Mylene Beyer  & unknown photographer
Zoom Info
iluvsouthernafrica:

Lesotho:
The Basotho women’s art of house decoration:  Litema
 “The word Litema (pronounced as “di-the-ma”) is derived from the word “ho lema” which means to cultivate, and “tema”, which denotes a ploughed field. The geometric patterns appeared initially on the inside of dwellings and it was only in the 19th century that it appeared on the outside of homes. In contemporary times the practice of Litema appears to be a seasonal phenomenon associated with special events such as celebrations and religious ceremonies. It not only announces births, deaths, weddings or the arrival of Christmas and Easter, but also serves as a reminder of the passage of time.
It is a tradition where women decorate a house after the men have finished building the house. These highly decorative designs are soft and flowing geometric patterns that are applied with fingers, forks and sticks on the walls of houses.The patterns are sometimes coloured with natural pigments or commercial paint and stains. Stones, embedded in mud and relief designs are sometimes used as a more permanent effect.
Before important events, an entire village might be decorated. Traditionally a chief artist or advisor was called upon to direct and advise the women of the village on the types of design or methods of application. The special occasion became a social event in itself. Whilst squatting and drinking tea, the most skilled Litema artist would sketch her intentions in the dust. Once consensus on a design had been reached, women set out to work. Nowadays, it appears, each woman (possibly joined by members of her household and daughters) prefers her individual design and house decoration. The start of decorating times are greeted with much excitement from friends and neighbours who generously participate in terms of giving advice and moral support. Thus it is still an opportunity for a social get-together. The tradition of mural art in Southern Africa, and in particular the tradition of Litema, is not of recent origins.
Like flowers, Litema blooms with the arrival of spring and wilts with the approach of winter. It dies with the temporary surface of mud it adorns. As the suns dries and cracks the design, the rains come to wash away the ‘dead’ design, making way for new decorative opportunities.”
Author: Rudi de Lange; Photos by Carina Mylene Beyer  & unknown photographer
Zoom Info
iluvsouthernafrica:

Lesotho:
The Basotho women’s art of house decoration:  Litema
 “The word Litema (pronounced as “di-the-ma”) is derived from the word “ho lema” which means to cultivate, and “tema”, which denotes a ploughed field. The geometric patterns appeared initially on the inside of dwellings and it was only in the 19th century that it appeared on the outside of homes. In contemporary times the practice of Litema appears to be a seasonal phenomenon associated with special events such as celebrations and religious ceremonies. It not only announces births, deaths, weddings or the arrival of Christmas and Easter, but also serves as a reminder of the passage of time.
It is a tradition where women decorate a house after the men have finished building the house. These highly decorative designs are soft and flowing geometric patterns that are applied with fingers, forks and sticks on the walls of houses.The patterns are sometimes coloured with natural pigments or commercial paint and stains. Stones, embedded in mud and relief designs are sometimes used as a more permanent effect.
Before important events, an entire village might be decorated. Traditionally a chief artist or advisor was called upon to direct and advise the women of the village on the types of design or methods of application. The special occasion became a social event in itself. Whilst squatting and drinking tea, the most skilled Litema artist would sketch her intentions in the dust. Once consensus on a design had been reached, women set out to work. Nowadays, it appears, each woman (possibly joined by members of her household and daughters) prefers her individual design and house decoration. The start of decorating times are greeted with much excitement from friends and neighbours who generously participate in terms of giving advice and moral support. Thus it is still an opportunity for a social get-together. The tradition of mural art in Southern Africa, and in particular the tradition of Litema, is not of recent origins.
Like flowers, Litema blooms with the arrival of spring and wilts with the approach of winter. It dies with the temporary surface of mud it adorns. As the suns dries and cracks the design, the rains come to wash away the ‘dead’ design, making way for new decorative opportunities.”
Author: Rudi de Lange; Photos by Carina Mylene Beyer  & unknown photographer
Zoom Info
iluvsouthernafrica:

Lesotho:
The Basotho women’s art of house decoration:  Litema
 “The word Litema (pronounced as “di-the-ma”) is derived from the word “ho lema” which means to cultivate, and “tema”, which denotes a ploughed field. The geometric patterns appeared initially on the inside of dwellings and it was only in the 19th century that it appeared on the outside of homes. In contemporary times the practice of Litema appears to be a seasonal phenomenon associated with special events such as celebrations and religious ceremonies. It not only announces births, deaths, weddings or the arrival of Christmas and Easter, but also serves as a reminder of the passage of time.
It is a tradition where women decorate a house after the men have finished building the house. These highly decorative designs are soft and flowing geometric patterns that are applied with fingers, forks and sticks on the walls of houses.The patterns are sometimes coloured with natural pigments or commercial paint and stains. Stones, embedded in mud and relief designs are sometimes used as a more permanent effect.
Before important events, an entire village might be decorated. Traditionally a chief artist or advisor was called upon to direct and advise the women of the village on the types of design or methods of application. The special occasion became a social event in itself. Whilst squatting and drinking tea, the most skilled Litema artist would sketch her intentions in the dust. Once consensus on a design had been reached, women set out to work. Nowadays, it appears, each woman (possibly joined by members of her household and daughters) prefers her individual design and house decoration. The start of decorating times are greeted with much excitement from friends and neighbours who generously participate in terms of giving advice and moral support. Thus it is still an opportunity for a social get-together. The tradition of mural art in Southern Africa, and in particular the tradition of Litema, is not of recent origins.
Like flowers, Litema blooms with the arrival of spring and wilts with the approach of winter. It dies with the temporary surface of mud it adorns. As the suns dries and cracks the design, the rains come to wash away the ‘dead’ design, making way for new decorative opportunities.”
Author: Rudi de Lange; Photos by Carina Mylene Beyer  & unknown photographer
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iluvsouthernafrica:

Lesotho:
The Basotho women’s art of house decoration:  Litema
 “The word Litema (pronounced as “di-the-ma”) is derived from the word “ho lema” which means to cultivate, and “tema”, which denotes a ploughed field. The geometric patterns appeared initially on the inside of dwellings and it was only in the 19th century that it appeared on the outside of homes. In contemporary times the practice of Litema appears to be a seasonal phenomenon associated with special events such as celebrations and religious ceremonies. It not only announces births, deaths, weddings or the arrival of Christmas and Easter, but also serves as a reminder of the passage of time.
It is a tradition where women decorate a house after the men have finished building the house. These highly decorative designs are soft and flowing geometric patterns that are applied with fingers, forks and sticks on the walls of houses.The patterns are sometimes coloured with natural pigments or commercial paint and stains. Stones, embedded in mud and relief designs are sometimes used as a more permanent effect.
Before important events, an entire village might be decorated. Traditionally a chief artist or advisor was called upon to direct and advise the women of the village on the types of design or methods of application. The special occasion became a social event in itself. Whilst squatting and drinking tea, the most skilled Litema artist would sketch her intentions in the dust. Once consensus on a design had been reached, women set out to work. Nowadays, it appears, each woman (possibly joined by members of her household and daughters) prefers her individual design and house decoration. The start of decorating times are greeted with much excitement from friends and neighbours who generously participate in terms of giving advice and moral support. Thus it is still an opportunity for a social get-together. The tradition of mural art in Southern Africa, and in particular the tradition of Litema, is not of recent origins.
Like flowers, Litema blooms with the arrival of spring and wilts with the approach of winter. It dies with the temporary surface of mud it adorns. As the suns dries and cracks the design, the rains come to wash away the ‘dead’ design, making way for new decorative opportunities.”
Author: Rudi de Lange; Photos by Carina Mylene Beyer  & unknown photographer
Zoom Info
iluvsouthernafrica:

Lesotho:
The Basotho women’s art of house decoration:  Litema
 “The word Litema (pronounced as “di-the-ma”) is derived from the word “ho lema” which means to cultivate, and “tema”, which denotes a ploughed field. The geometric patterns appeared initially on the inside of dwellings and it was only in the 19th century that it appeared on the outside of homes. In contemporary times the practice of Litema appears to be a seasonal phenomenon associated with special events such as celebrations and religious ceremonies. It not only announces births, deaths, weddings or the arrival of Christmas and Easter, but also serves as a reminder of the passage of time.
It is a tradition where women decorate a house after the men have finished building the house. These highly decorative designs are soft and flowing geometric patterns that are applied with fingers, forks and sticks on the walls of houses.The patterns are sometimes coloured with natural pigments or commercial paint and stains. Stones, embedded in mud and relief designs are sometimes used as a more permanent effect.
Before important events, an entire village might be decorated. Traditionally a chief artist or advisor was called upon to direct and advise the women of the village on the types of design or methods of application. The special occasion became a social event in itself. Whilst squatting and drinking tea, the most skilled Litema artist would sketch her intentions in the dust. Once consensus on a design had been reached, women set out to work. Nowadays, it appears, each woman (possibly joined by members of her household and daughters) prefers her individual design and house decoration. The start of decorating times are greeted with much excitement from friends and neighbours who generously participate in terms of giving advice and moral support. Thus it is still an opportunity for a social get-together. The tradition of mural art in Southern Africa, and in particular the tradition of Litema, is not of recent origins.
Like flowers, Litema blooms with the arrival of spring and wilts with the approach of winter. It dies with the temporary surface of mud it adorns. As the suns dries and cracks the design, the rains come to wash away the ‘dead’ design, making way for new decorative opportunities.”
Author: Rudi de Lange; Photos by Carina Mylene Beyer  & unknown photographer
Zoom Info
iluvsouthernafrica:

Lesotho:
The Basotho women’s art of house decoration:  Litema
 “The word Litema (pronounced as “di-the-ma”) is derived from the word “ho lema” which means to cultivate, and “tema”, which denotes a ploughed field. The geometric patterns appeared initially on the inside of dwellings and it was only in the 19th century that it appeared on the outside of homes. In contemporary times the practice of Litema appears to be a seasonal phenomenon associated with special events such as celebrations and religious ceremonies. It not only announces births, deaths, weddings or the arrival of Christmas and Easter, but also serves as a reminder of the passage of time.
It is a tradition where women decorate a house after the men have finished building the house. These highly decorative designs are soft and flowing geometric patterns that are applied with fingers, forks and sticks on the walls of houses.The patterns are sometimes coloured with natural pigments or commercial paint and stains. Stones, embedded in mud and relief designs are sometimes used as a more permanent effect.
Before important events, an entire village might be decorated. Traditionally a chief artist or advisor was called upon to direct and advise the women of the village on the types of design or methods of application. The special occasion became a social event in itself. Whilst squatting and drinking tea, the most skilled Litema artist would sketch her intentions in the dust. Once consensus on a design had been reached, women set out to work. Nowadays, it appears, each woman (possibly joined by members of her household and daughters) prefers her individual design and house decoration. The start of decorating times are greeted with much excitement from friends and neighbours who generously participate in terms of giving advice and moral support. Thus it is still an opportunity for a social get-together. The tradition of mural art in Southern Africa, and in particular the tradition of Litema, is not of recent origins.
Like flowers, Litema blooms with the arrival of spring and wilts with the approach of winter. It dies with the temporary surface of mud it adorns. As the suns dries and cracks the design, the rains come to wash away the ‘dead’ design, making way for new decorative opportunities.”
Author: Rudi de Lange; Photos by Carina Mylene Beyer  & unknown photographer
Zoom Info

iluvsouthernafrica:

Lesotho:

The Basotho women’s art of house decoration:  Litema


“The word Litema (pronounced as “di-the-ma”) is derived from the word “ho lema” which means to cultivate, and “tema”, which denotes a ploughed field. The geometric patterns appeared initially on the inside of dwellings and it was only in the 19th century that it appeared on the outside of homes. In contemporary times the practice of Litema appears to be a seasonal phenomenon associated with special events such as celebrations and religious ceremonies. It not only announces births, deaths, weddings or the arrival of Christmas and Easter, but also serves as a reminder of the passage of time.


It is a tradition where women decorate a house after the men have finished building the house. These highly decorative designs are soft and flowing geometric patterns that are applied with fingers, forks and sticks on the walls of houses.The patterns are sometimes coloured with natural pigments or commercial paint and stains. Stones, embedded in mud and relief designs are sometimes used as a more permanent effect.


Before important events, an entire village might be decorated. Traditionally a chief artist or advisor was called upon to direct and advise the women of the village on the types of design or methods of application. The special occasion became a social event in itself. Whilst squatting and drinking tea, the most skilled Litema artist would sketch her intentions in the dust. Once consensus on a design had been reached, women set out to work. Nowadays, it appears, each woman (possibly joined by members of her household and daughters) prefers her individual design and house decoration. The start of decorating times are greeted with much excitement from friends and neighbours who generously participate in terms of giving advice and moral support. Thus it is still an opportunity for a social get-together. The tradition of mural art in Southern Africa, and in particular the tradition of Litema, is not of recent origins.

Like flowers, Litema blooms with the arrival of spring and wilts with the approach of winter. It dies with the temporary surface of mud it adorns. As the suns dries and cracks the design, the rains come to wash away the ‘dead’ design, making way for new decorative opportunities.”

Author: Rudi de Lange; Photos by Carina Mylene Beyer  & unknown photographer